News – “12 Nerdy But Brilliant Cooking Tips From A Food Scientist”

buzzfeed.comFor those of you who don’t know, Harold McGee is a writer who focuses on the intersection of cooking and science.

His book, On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, is a go-to resource for teaching young cooks the fundamentals of cooking through science.

 

youtube.com

His book, On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, is a go-to resource for teaching young cooks the fundamentals of cooking through science.

So here are 12 of his most brilliantly nerdy cooking tips (and some busted misconceptions) that’ll make you a better cook:

 
Cartoon Network

1. As soon as you drain your boiled veggies, coat them in oil to prevent them from drying out.

After boiling, your veggies will be hot and steaming — and steam means "they're losing moisture." The best way to fight this (and make sure your veggies don't dry out and get wrinkly) is to coat them in something waterproof like oil or butter to keep "the moisture and goodness" inside the veggies. Check out the whole video here.

 

youtube.com

After boiling, your veggies will be hot and steaming — and steam means “they’re losing moisture.” The best way to fight this (and make sure your veggies don’t dry out and get wrinkly) is to coat them in something waterproof like oil or butter to keep “the moisture and goodness” inside the veggies. Check out the whole video here.

2. If you’re making a creamy sauce that’s made with an acidic ingredient (like wine or lemon juice), use heavy cream instead of milk to prevent it from curdling.

A lot of recipes tell you to add dairy at the last minute to prevent curdling, and even so the sauces still get chunky sometimes — but not all dairy does this! "The exceptions are heavy cream and crème fraîche, which contain so little casein that its curdling simply isn’t noticeable." So feel free to heat your dairy-based sauce to a simmer, just make sure it's made with cream (and not milk).

Imv / Getty Images

A lot of recipes tell you to add dairy at the last minute to prevent curdling, and even so the sauces still get chunky sometimes — but not all dairy does this! “The exceptions are heavy cream and crème fraîche, which contain so little casein that its curdling simply isn’t noticeable.” So feel free to heat your dairy-based sauce to a simmer, just make sure it’s made with cream (and not milk).


Very insightful article, I actually sent it over to ma dukes after I got done reading it because it was so helpful.

Leave a Reply